Hey y’all! A few weeks ago I had to take the U.S. citizenship test (the one given to immigrants) because it is now required to graduate. While looking at the basically pointless study guide, I was thinking that it could be funny to have someone not from the U.S. take the test.

And who would be better than one of you? Mit agreed to take the test on my behalf, (thanks again btw) so welcome to a british boys version of the U.S. citizenship test!

(The questions are normal, his answers are highlighted/ bolded, and mine are in italics)

1. What is the supreme law of the land? 

   a. The Declaration of Independence
   b. The Bill of Rights
   c. The Constitution 
   d. Executive Order 9066
One particular executive order doesn’t seem worthy of ‘supreme’ so I can rule that out. It’s the Constitution that Americans seem to bring up when anything regarding guns is mentioned, so that seems like a the right option. 
And you would be correct. I assumed you had at least heard of it, so good job.

2. What do we call the first ten amendments to the Constitution?
   a. The Roosevelt Corollary
   b.  The Monroe Doctrine
   c. The Bill of Rights 
   d. The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation seem to refer to something else, so it’s between the first three. The third sounds familiar. 
Wow, two for two. The Articles of Confederation was the first version of the Constitution that was a huge mess basically. The Roosevelt Corollary was an addition to the previous Monroe Doctrine states that the United States will intervene in conflicts between European countries and Latin American countries to enforce legitimate claims of the European powers. 
3.What is the “rule of law”?
Something that states that if several were to commit the same crime, they would be seen as equals in the eyes of the law.
I’m starting to think that you looked up the answers or something…. but yeah everyone is under control of the law, even ze President. 
4. Name one branch of the government
Congress? That sounds about right but maybe it belongs so something else that I don’t know. 
Good guess, Congress is something else although it does have to do with the legislative branch. There’s 3 branches of government, executive, legislative, and judicial. 
5. The idea of self-government is in the first three words of the Constitution. What are these words?
“Self-government is real” I really have no idea about this one.
Hahaha, no. It’s “We the People” .  
6. What stops one branch from becoming too powerful?
   a. Checks and balances 
   b. Executive power
   c. A signed agreement from the head of each branch
Executive power makes it seem like a dictatorship, and I’m not sure if a signed agreement would work. 
Another one right. I really just kind of made up the other answers mostly. 
7. How many U.S. Senators are there?
   a. 35
   b. 100
   c. 50
   d. 25
One for every state sounds about right.
Close, but not quite. There’s two for every state so the answer is 100. 
8. How many voting members does the House of Representatives have?
   a. 100
   b. 435 
   c. 55
   d. 78
It’s much higher than the others.
I’m actually surprised you got this one right, but congrats. 
9. What is the name of the President of the United States now?
Donald J. Trump
Obviously. 
10. Which is a cabinet-level position?
      a. Secretary of Immigration
      b. Secretary of Territories
      c. Secretary of Energy 
      d. Secretary of Architecture
I think it’s between a and c as they seem more serious. I don’t even know if a exists, so I’m going to go with c.
I thought for sure you would get this wrong, but you’re right! 
11. Under the Constitution, some powers belong to the states. What is one power of the states?
       a. To print money
       b. To declare war 
       c. To provide schooling and education
       d. To make treaties
It’s a pretty big deal and I’m not sure anyone else apart from the state could do this.
Nope, the states can’t declare war. This is a power of the federal government. 
12. What is one right only for U.S. citizens?
The right to bear arms.
I mean you’re  technically not completely wrong, but people that aren’t citizens technically can too in their own countries… the answer is to vote and/or run in a federal election. 
13. What did the Emancipation Proclamation do?
It was a declaration that stated that all citizens of the USA should be emancipated.
Again, not entirely wrong. The Emancipation Proclamation was declared by Abraham Lincoln in 1863, and it freed all slaves in the Southern States. 
14. How old do citizens have to be to vote for President?
18
Yup. 
15. When must all men register for the Selective Service?
a. Only in times of war 
     b. Between the ages of 18-26
     c. Only when the president requires
C sounds a bit far-fetched (that the president alone decides you have to sign up to the army) if you have  and I don’t believe that every male citizen of the United States has to do military service.
The answer is actually b- between the ages of 18-26. And while every male is registered, it doesn’t mean that they will be drafted. That would only happen if there was a serious war and if  there weren’t enough volunteers. 
16. Who lived in America before the colonists arrived?
a. Native Americans/ American Indians
     b. Mexicans
     c. Spanish
This just seems right.
Right again. Native Americans in the correct term, but people say Indians all the time. 
17. What is one reason colonists came to America?
They thought it was India (hence ‘American Indians’ right?)
Ooh smart one, but you’re still wrong . That was how/why America was discovered. Colonists came for a few reasons, religious freedom, economic opportunity, freedom, etc. 
18. Who is the “Father of Our Country”?
   a. Abraham Lincoln
   b. Eugene Debbs
   c. Alexander Hamilton
d. George Washington
He was the first President, so it would make sense.
Right again. Lincoln and Hamilton were presidents later on, and Eugene Debbs was a guy who broke a law and ran for President from prison. Pretty cool if you ask me. 
19. What are the 3 rights the Declaration of Independence outlines?
1. The USA has their own government. 
2. The government is to be elected by the people.
3. Colonists have to leave.
All good guesses but the answers are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Thomas Jefferson took John Locke’s natural rights and changed property to the pursuit of happiness because it can justify almost anything. 
20. What was the name of the war that split the U.S. from Britain?
The War of Independence.
Nope xD. It’s the Revolutionary War. Well at least here, do you guys call it that??? 
Okay, and just for fun… fill in the blanks of the Pledge of Allegiance.
I pledge allegiance to the government of the United States, and to the Constitution for which it stands, glorious Nation, under mountains of debt, indivisible with liberty and hamburgers for all.
I honestly think I might like your version better, my friends and I are all laughing.
The real pledge goes- I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. 
Over all, Mit got 10/20 right which is exactly half! I hope you guys found this funny/ entertaining! How do you think you would have done?
Love y’all! -Aspen AKA The Author
 
 
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